Tuesday, 27 October 2020

Back To The Clappers

When I visited Sharpenhoe Clappers back in June I promised myself that I'd return in the Autumn. I and myself don't always honour our promises to each other, but this time we kept our word. If you want to know about the area and its intriguing name you'll have to follow the link above back to the earlier post.

Early morning sunlight.


The beech woodland on the hilltop.


The land here was bequeathed to the National Trust
by W A Robertson, in memory of his two brothers
who were killed in WWI


View over the fields towards the village
of Barton-le-Clay


There's quite a network of footpaths to follow
some marked on the map and some not


The seed heads of Travellers Joy
aka Old Man's Beard


It's very common on these hills and can
almost look like a scattering of snow on the tops of the hedges


A quarry is lit by a patch of sun


Looking across the plains of Bedfordshire


Passing through Streatley village to make a circular walk


St Margaret's Church in Streatley


The wooded Moleskin Hill


Les leading the way


Completing our circuit.


Take care


31 comments:

  1. Another fine walk! I love that 1st pic a lot!

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  2. I am so very grateful that you kept that promise to yourself and shared the beauty.
    What a fine tribute to his brothers W A Robertson made.
    And yes, the old man's beard does look like snow drifts.

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  3. Again the understory trees and those in the woods still holding on to the green. More autumn shades on the wood edges. I must go back and read your June post about this spot. It is lovely.

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  4. Old Man's Beard--I like that. I wonder, is it parasitic? Like the vine we call dodder?

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    1. It's a climber, closely related to the Clematis grown in gardens. In some places it is an invasive species and can smother young plants, but it's native to the UK and seems to be controlled here by several moths whose larvae depend on it for a food source.

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  5. The woodland shots are spectacular. The one with Les is my favourite.

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  6. I agree with Marie, that was my favorite too, until I saw the last one with fall colors! Great collection.

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  7. That looks a wonderful walk, John. I am jealous.

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  8. What a beautiful walk! The second photo feels like the trees are dancing, stretching their arms out for a walz.

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  9. Hi John - what gorgeous photos ... and a wonderful walk you must have had. Love it - and Old Man's Beard is a wonderful plant at this time of year ... thanks - take care - Hilary

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  10. The branches on the beach trees intrigue me. Surely that is not natural they way they lean across the path. Is it a trick of the camera, or have the branches been trained to cross the trail? I like the effect.

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    1. No, it's certainly not a trick of the camera; they really do grow like that. They are at the edge of dense woodland and I can only assume that they've grown like that in their quest for uninterrupted sunlight.

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  11. I just love these walks that you and Les take. The winding leaf-covered paths are so beautiful and then the long views, always so lovely.

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  12. I never heard of the Old Man's Beard plant. It's very interesting though. What beautiful photos. I love the narrow village streets and all the stone buildings. The views of the countryside are simply gorgeous. Thank you for sharing these walks with us. Enjoy your day, hugs, Edna B.

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  13. Beautiful Autumn colors! Glad you kept your promise to yourself and returned to this lovely hike! Thanks!

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  14. I can see why you wanted to come back and visit this area in autumn. It is beautiful! Thanks for sharing your journey.

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  15. Thats really a nice walk!Ohh i want to go to england when i see this

    Ilike the most the first ,second and the fifth,,but all is very charming!

    Wish you a nice evening!

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  16. Another fine walk, John. The area really serves up some beautiful views.
    Have a wonderful evening and thanks for sharing these beautiful photos.

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  17. They are beautiful with the autumn colors and a lovely place for a walk. You are lucky to have public footpaths with the ability to ramble through so much of the countryside.

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  18. incredibly beautiful * thank you for these autumn landscapes!

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  19. Some fine scenery and autumn colours there. What a treat.

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  20. Wow what a beautiful walk. Love the beech woodland on top of the hill. Fabulous photo.

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  21. Stunning vistas John, you really do capture so much beauty on your walks for which I thank you. Autumn in merry England is exquisitely beautiful 🍁

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  22. That was a terrific walk, no walking here in S Ontario today, rainy, windy, cool, some snow flurries expected! Your photographs of your walks are lovely. I can't wait to get back to England again and enjoy the rural scenery, sadly I think it's going to be quite a while before I can do that.

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  23. There's a lot more green on your walks than currently around here, John. An earlier than expected snow last Friday and a cold snap have put an abrupt end to most fall colors here. The seed heads of the Travellers Joy plant were quite lovely. One of the years we would really enjoy a walk in the English countryside as yours are always so inviting.

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  24. What a beautiful landscape. It really was a wonderful walking trip.
    Hugs

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  25. I thought I had commented on this. That mus have been a very enjoyable walk! There sure are some grand views here!

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