Saturday, 14 July 2018

A Garden In July

My monthly trip to the Botanic Garden in Cambridge has rolled around once more. I have to start with the flower that always typifies hot summers for me and that's the coneflower or Echinacea. The centres seem to be bursting with sunlight while the petals appear to be exhausted by the heat!



But I knew where I ought to be heading in this warm, dry spell of weather which we're having at present - The Dry Garden. It's a small area within the larger garden which is devoted to drought-resistant plants which may become the norm if global-warming is allowed to continue on its merry way. The next four photos were taken in the Dry Garden.





The curious black "flower" is Aeonium 'Zwartkop'. 
The Dry Garden is interesting and attractive though a long way from the lush greenness which we associate with gardens here in the UK.




On the Rockery the little Peruvian Lilies were putting on quite a show.




And there were quite large areas devoted to various flower mixes. A sign explained, almost apologetically, that these were experimental research plots - in my opinion they can do as much experimental research as they like if it gives such stunning results as these.



The beds beside the small stream were a riot of growth and colour.








I sat by the lake for a while, but even here it felt more like the Amazon rain forest than England with many dragonflies skimming over the water.


Take care.




13 comments:

  1. I once had a Aeonium 'Zwartkop but sadly forgot to bring it inside for the winter months.
    The colouring and combinations of flowers used are stunning, as are your photos.

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  2. Our coneflowers seem to have held a particular attraction for rabbits this year. As fast as they emerged out of the ground they got chewed right off. We don’t have a single bloom.

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  3. I love coneflowers, the ones you show seem a bit thirsty indeed :). We are planning a visit tomorrow to a nearby garden nursery specialised in coneflowers.
    Zwartkop is Dutch for 'black head'.

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  4. Hi John - love the cone flowers, but also seeing the dry garden ... as too the experimental patches ... I agree - they are beautiful ... while the pond looks a delightful restful spot. We've got lots of dragon flies over here too ... lovely photos - and thank you - cheers Hilary

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  5. It does look like a rain forest! That place is good for the spirit!

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  6. Hot as Hades here, no rain for the past week. My flowers that survived a recent visit by deer are looking sad indeed. I'm ready to pull everything out and wait to plant fall stuff. The dry garden intrigues me though--I should think about that as dry surely describes my hillside.

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  7. Always love seeing the flower garden there. I'm so glad you go for a regular visit and share the beauty with us.

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  8. Wonderful photos. I love your description of Echinacea... centers bursting with sunlight with petals exhausted by the heat. Yes, they really do look that way! I'm also intrigued by that thistle in photo #3. Makes for a great photo against a dark background.

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  9. How lovely the garden is in July, the dry garden looks very cool as does the lake, I love the Echinacea flowers and the sea holly:)

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  10. Glorious hot summer blooms. as you say John, rather un-English country garden but tres attractive in their own way ✨

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  11. It's interesting how many beautiful flowers and plants there are that require very little water.

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  12. Such beautiful flowers! My echinacea is blooming too, but I have to keep a cage around it because the rabbits seem to think it's delicious.

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