Monday, 4 May 2015

A Gap Between The Showers.

It stopped raining for a few minutes yesterday afternoon so I popped out to see what was happening in the wood. Bluebells were blooming, as you can see. I'm not sure if these are good old English bluebells or those nasty foreign ones that are taking over in so many places. Pretty anyway.


Even gnarled old trees like this one are resplendent in their new finery as leaves burst out all over.


Down in the meadow - literally down, as in down on my knees - to view the buttercups from an insect's point of view.


Look up, little insect, there are cowslips in the meadow too.


Topcliffe Mill, which was once a watermill to grind wheat and barley, stands smartly in the corner of the meadow, next to the little gate leading to a public footpath. 


That cheerful little flower, Herb Robert, growing in the churchyard. It grows in my garden too, no matter how much of it I pull out! "Fresh leaves can be eaten or tossed into a mug to make tea", or so I've read in a book. Judging by the stink it leaves on your hands I wouldn't want to try it. It also repels mosquitoes, which shows that your average mozzy has more sense than people who write books!



"Pansies, lilies, kingcups, daisies, 
Let them live upon their praises; 
Long as there's a sun that sets, 
Primroses will have their glory,
Long as there are violets, 
They will have a place in story: 
There is a flower that shall be mine, 
'T is the little Celandine."

Thus wrote Mr William Wordsworth of the Lesser Celandine. In fact he wrote three poems about the flower, but despite the poet's enthusiasm few others seem to notice it.



While poets and photographers are down on their knees admiring the flora an almighty storm could be brewing just behind them. Best head for home and get the kettle on.


Take care.



21 comments:

  1. Lovely post John. No sign of a buttercup here yet though.

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  2. Your spring is way ahead of ours and I love seeing your flowers. That's quite a storm coming up behind you. I hope you made it home before your camera got wet!

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  3. Looks like a beautiful day in May - until that last picture!

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  4. I think if the flowers are on a blue bell are essentially on one side of the stalk, it's native. Which is what I'd say about the ones in your delightful picture

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  5. John, I am impressed that you can identify all of these flowers. Especially the lesser celandine.

    (And, no, I don't usually buy anything at the stores where I photograph the proprietors. It is my charm that leads them to smile nicely.)

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  6. I often think of a bugs view of the world...even before the movie Honey I Shrunk the Kids. Always used to wonder what they thought of us...then came to the conclusion they probably don't think anything.

    Beautiful flowers...and love that mill...the way you photographed it.

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  7. Love seeing how beautifully green it is there. I miss that here in California. Already the parched dry season is upon us, and summer is still weeks away. I'm glad you photograph these lovely verdant sights, so I can remember.

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  8. Lovely collection of photos. Sadly those bluebells are the Spanish ones. Sussex Wildlife Trust recently posted a handy guide... http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/uploads/bluebell_infographic_.pdf

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  9. That was one creative and wonderful gap between the showers. The bluebells are fantastic. I didn't see such beautiful flowers before. Like how you took pictures from ant's point of view. I also find myself very often on my knees or laying down while taking pictures.

    Beautiful flowers and amazing captures!!!

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  10. The buttercups are lovely!

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  11. Great photos. I especially like the shots down at ground level!

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  12. Delightful post! I enjoyed seeing what's blooming there at the moment.

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  13. All the little spring flowers are the best. And I guess we need that rain sometimes, so long as there is sun in between.

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  14. Wild flowers are my favourites - I've got all of those in my garden and they are very welcome to stay!

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  15. Bravo John! Great photographs especially the one of the buttercups from an insects eye view. Fabulous depth of field. I also like the one of the Herb Robert. Great shot.

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  16. Not only fresh flowers but also aged trees glint with new leaves of spring. I like the expression, “resplendent in their new finery”; I’d like to borrow it. I really enjoyed viewing the flowers with insects’ eye thanks to your efforts to take these pictures on the wet soil right after the rain. Is the weather in May so changeable in the UK? Hope you had a nice tea time back home.

    Yoko



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  17. Bluebells and Herb Robert plus many other photos spells spring for sure -- nice. -- barbara

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  18. We've been out into kent to see Bluebells. A real treat.

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  19. Lovely photos, I particularly like the "insect's point of view" ones, and the Herb Robert.

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  20. I love your down on your knees images. looked like a nasty storm.

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